Elizabeth Anglin

Psychic, Spirit Medium, Animal Communicator

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Responsible Hunting...

Posted by elizabethanglin on October 28, 2012 at 2:55 AM

Yes, I am an animal communicator, and yes... I am writing about responsible hunting.   I find myself in the situation of living in the most sought after hunting units in the United States.  Unit 61 - Western Colorado.  If you don't know that means to hunters... look it up.  People wait decades to receive hunting tags here.   I live here, on one of the richest most incredible parcels of land... on a small ridge overlooking the area where the Elk have their annual rutt - or elk Pow Wow - since rutt for elk involves lots of singing, dancing, mating, and fighting. 

And I'm feeling a bit verklimpt by it all at this point.  Verklimpt not by the elk, or their singing, or their dancing, their fighting, or their mating... but by the people who come here to see the elk, shoot them, and take their meat and heads home as trophies.   And no, I don't have any innate "animal communicator" prejudice against hunters.  I go out "hunting" almost every day with my eyes and ears.  I want to see the elk, I want to see the big bulls polishing their big antlers on the tiny trees before their big fights.  I am still paleolithic enough in my genes to know that if I am presented with a rack of elk loin cooked over an open fire, eating it will cause my body to produce endorphins - happy brain chemicals that will tell my anxious mind that "all is well" because "I am not in danger of starving to death."   Brain chemicals that I just don't get enough of through being a vegan. And yes, I am a vegan at this moment.... though I have been an ovo-lacto vegetarian and a flat out unrepentent meatatarian. 

I'm not upset about the ethical considerations of eating - whether it's animals or vegetables that are being eaten.  No... I'm verklimpt about something much more subtle than eating.

What I am witnessing in the people I see coming here from elsewhere is an almost universal way of BEING DISCONNECTED or DISASSOCIATED with nature. 

People come here with ideas, thoughts and agendas that have nothing to do with this natural place, this brilliant life ecosystem, or with the animals that live here - and THEY DON'T CARE that what they are thinking, doing, or planning to do has nothing to do with all the life that is around them.

Today I made the mistake of taking a walk on my neighbor's land - not because it is forbidden, but because it is hunting season.  Normally, there is no one on my neighbor's land - except for maybe me, my dogs, and some elk and deer, and eagles, and hawks, and magpies and mountain lions, and lynxes and coyotes and other critters.  In any case, like I usually do - I took a walk through the area that all the elk and deer use as a sort of superhighway - from one great eating and drinking area to another.   I always like to walk through this area because I always see elk and deer.. and I enjoy seeing them.    But today I disturbed a hunter, apparently a hunter who was a "guest" of my neighbor, potentially even a "paying guest" of my neighbor... OK, almost certainly a "paying guest" of my neighbor.  I waved at the hunter cordially, happily, and called out "having any luck?"  - a question this hunter did not respond to.  And I could tell - he was upset.  He wasn't "having any luck" in his own mind.  He was questioning the value of being a guest on this particular parcel of land, he was worrying that perhaps he wouldn't find, hunt and kill any large trophy bulls or bucks, and that he would waste his time, and his money, on a foolish decision about where to hunt this year.  In short - this hunter, sitting in one of the most prime spots of the most prime hunting units in the most prime portion of the most prime state in the most prime country on the most prime planet in the universe - was an anxious, urbanified, IDIOT. 

An urbanified idiot who couldn't tell his own arse from his elbow - even if his own elbow bit him in his own arse.  

Nothing about him was in any sort of harmony with his surroundings.  Nothing about his mental state, his way of BEING had anything at all to do with where he was standing.  The richest, most amazing, most incredible elk and deer hunting spot in the world.    He was upset because all of sudden - a WOMAN with DOGS had wandered across this most incredible elk hunting spot, waving, saying hello, and wearing bright purple instead of neon orange.    And obviously, because I was a WOMAN (in bright purple with dogs) and I was waving and saying hello .... this spot COULD NOT BE a GOOD PLACE TO FIND ELK.

And all I have to say to this mentality is the following: 

Wilderness is not Disneyland.  You can't buy a ticket and go ride the ride.  If you go to the wilderness with the same mentality a person takes with them to go to the movies, or Six Flags, or a trip to London... you will be disappointed.  If you go to the wilderness with a specific single minded agenda, whether that agenda is to kill something big as quickly and efficiently as possible, hike fast and bag a 14,000 foot peak, get to the next view point on the trail, or run your ATV up and down the road as fast as possible... you will be missing something very important about the wilderness.  You will be too busy relating to your own agenda to relate with anything, or anyone, who lives in the wilderness.  You will learn nothing about reality.  You will only be learning about what you hold in your own mind as being important... which will not be at all important to the creatures who live in the wilderness.  You will be nothing more than a sort of space alien who never goes anywhere outside of it's own space alien mindship.   You might physically be "somewhere else" but you don't really go anywhere if you don't have a capacity to visit "somewhere else" in your mind as well as your body.

Anyway, enough about my opinon...  

I felt this hunters frustration quite keenly, but because usually NO ONE is on my neighbor's land, I asked my animal communication guide if he "belonged there."    She of course (being very close to me) said "No."   Then I asked her if this hunter intended to "hunt responsibly."  her answer to the question was also "No." 

She related that it was too early for responsible hunting.  Responsible hunting could only be done in the winter, when it involved spotting and tracking elderly, weak or sick Elk, who would most certainly suffer greatly from cold and slow starvation if they were not hunted and killed more quickly than the winter snow and cold would kill them. 

She then went on to relate that human beings currently operated under a falacious idea of responsible hunting, having the opinion that hunting before winter time was "responsible" because it would thin the herd and allow more animals to survive through the winter.  She was clear that this was very "irresponsible" hunting because it involved killing the healthy and the strong - and especially, killing those who were not in any danger of long suffering and slow death through cold weather and starvation.

In short, to hunt responsibly, human beings would need to go back to hunting in the same way wolves hunt. 

Hunting only the weak, the sick, and the elderly in the population.

Right now, there is no "responsible" human hunting. 

Right now hunting is done for ego, show, sport... a programmed agenda in the alien mindship.

And for most hunters, it has nothing at all to do with "being in the wilderness."

And this is what I feel dis-ease about, this is why I feel so verklimpt.  Even if I am "in the wilderness" and I meet someone else while I am here, I find that I am still "in the wilderness" alone.   Other human beings bring their bodies here, but they don't really notice where they are.  

They only notice what they hold in their minds.







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1 Comment

Reply Elaine Bylos
1:32 PM on July 22, 2013 
I share your verklimptness and trust that, in time, humanity will find a place of balance and respect for both the wilderness and themselves.